China & The Next World Gold Standard System

China & The Next World Gold Standard System

Peter Schiff 2017 - Economic Predictions - Financial Crisis 2017 Will Dollar Collapse

Peter Schiff on the Chinese Market Crash-Is China Moving Toward a Gold Standard? - Jul 10, 2015

"Just like most of the products Americans buy are made in China, most of the economic problems the Chinese have are made in America," says investment guru and radio host Peter Schiff, CEO of Euro Pacific Capital. "The Chinese have decided to peg their currency to the dollar and so they have imported our monetary policy."

But as Schiff explained to Reason's Matt Welch, that may be changing. China's recent market woes may force China to change its monetary policy and Schiff believes the Chinese government is laying the groundwork to back its currency by gold.

"Quietly they have been increasing thier ownership of gold," says Schiff. "They want to untether their currency from the dollar but they don't want it to be backed by nothing."

 

China Is Laying The Foundation For The Next World Gold Standard System

An essay by Dr. Zhou Xiaochuan, governor of China’s central bank, in March 2009.

"The outbreak of the current crisis and its spillover in the world have confronted us with a long-existing but still unanswered question, i.e., what kind of international reserve currency do we need to secure global financial stability and facilitate world economic growth, which was one of the purposes for establishing the IMF? There were various institutional arrangements in an attempt to find a solution, including the Silver Standard, the Gold Standard, the Gold Exchange Standard and the Bretton Woods system. The above question, however, as the ongoing financial crisis demonstrates, is far from being solved, and has become even more severe due to the inherent weaknesses of the current international monetary system.

Theoretically, an international reserve currency should first be anchored to a stable benchmark and issued according to a clear set of rules, therefore to ensure orderly supply; second, its supply should be flexible enough to allow timely adjustment according to the changing demand; third, such adjustments should be disconnected from economic conditions and sovereign interests of any single country. The acceptance of credit-based national currencies as major international reserve currencies, as is the case in the current system, is a rare special case in history. The crisis again calls for creative reform of the existing international monetary system towards an international reserve currency with a stable value, rule-based issuance and manageable supply, so as to achieve the objective of safeguarding global economic and financial stability."

https://www.forbes.com/sites/nathanlewis/2016/05/05/china-is-laying-the-...